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13th International Conference on Alzheimer’s Disease & Dementia, will be organized around the theme “Advancements and Breakthroughs in the Fields of Dementia Research and Development”

Dementia 2019 is comprised of keynote and speakers sessions on latest cutting edge research designed to offer comprehensive global discussions that address current issues in Dementia 2019

Submit your abstract to any of the mentioned tracks.

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\r\n Dementia is the term used to describe the symptoms of several conditions that affecting the brain. The commonly seen condition is Alzheimer’s, and other includes Parkinson's disease. Symptoms seen at early stages are personality changes, withdrawal, memory loss, confusion and apathy. Early diagnosis helps with providing early treatment, support and planning. Medications might help with some symptoms of dementia, but no permanent cure.

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\r\n Majority of people with dementia are above age 65, the condition is not normal for all older people. The occurrence of dementia gets high with age, but it’s not given that an older person will develop it. While only 1-in-4 people with Alzheimer’s disease or Dementia has been diagnosed. Few more things we need to know about vascular dementia, Dementia with lewy bodies, Fronto-temporal dementia, Rarer causes of dementia, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, HIV-related cognitive impairment, Mild cognitive impairment.

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  • Track 1-1Memory loss
  • Track 1-2Alzheimer’s versus Frontotemporal Dementia
  • Track 1-3Facing Dementia

\r\n Persons with dementia have multiple psychological feature deficits that include each memory impairment, that affects the flexibility to find out new info or recall information previously learned, and one or additional of the subsequent symptoms-aphasia, apraxia, agnosia, or executive dysfunction-such that the psychological feature deficits negatively have an effect on social or activity functioning with a big decline in previous talents. Additionally, persons with dementia typically suffer from comorbid conditions that additional complicate care and impede best outcomes. Therefore, developing caregiving methods people with dementia is urgent, given this increasing prevalence and therefore the associated burden that dementia places not only on the individuals, however on the caregivers, relations, and therefore the resources of the health care system. Conventional views bearing on geriatric nursing typically paint an image of the care as being slow paced certain and less demanding than acute care. However, care of the aged, and particularly those with dementia, is usually complicated, unpredictable, and unstable.

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\r\n This session includes Education and training of medical professionals, Care and quality of life, Person centered care, Cognitive training, Support and training for informal and professional careers, Putting scientific knowledge into practice, Non-pharmacological Interventions, Functional foods, Art, music and life style.

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  • Track 2-1Assessment and Care planning
  • Track 2-2Community care and Family/lay caregiving
  • Track 2-3Psychosocial Research in Dementia
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\r\n Scientists look at the brain’s grey matter when investigating about Alzheimer’s disease. A fresh study, found that degenerating white matter in the brain could be an early indicator of disease. A study was published in Radiology which concludes that white matter plays an important role in how the disease strikes and progresses. Abnormal deposits of proteins that form amyloid plaques and tau tangles all over the brain in Alzheimer’s disease. It can also be characterized by shrinkage of brain tissues due to neurons loss.

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\r\n This session includes Amyloid and Tau imaging, Imaging animal models, Imaging and genetics, New methods in imaging, Structural and functional MRI, Positron emission tomography, MR spectroscopy, EEG and brain mapping, SPECT imaging, Imaging correlates of clinical, cognitive and biomarker variables.

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  • Track 3-1Functional MRI (fMRI)
  • Track 3-2Computed Tomography
  • Track 3-3Neuroimaging techniques

\r\n Alzheimer's is caused by brain cell death. It is a neurological disorder in which the death of brain cells causes memory loss and cognitive decline. The total size of the brain shrinks in Alzheimer's, nerve cells and connections in the tissue progressively reduced, which cannot be seen or tested in the living brain affected by Alzheimer's disease, post-mortem/autopsy will always show tiny inclusions in the nerve tissues, called as plaques and tangles. Plaques are found between the dying cells in the brain - from the build-up of a protein called beta-amyloid (amyloid plaques). The tangles exist in the brain neurons, from a disintegration of second protein, called tau.

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\r\n Worldwide, with Dementia or Related disorders nearly 44 million people have suffered in 2015, past results shown 35.66 million population lived with dementia  worldwide in year 2010, with numbers expected to nearly double each twenty years, to 65.7 million in 2030 and 115.4 million in 2050. In 2010, fifty-eight per cent of all population with dementia lived in countries with lower or moderate incomes, with this proportion anticipated to rise to 63% till 2030 and 71% by 2050. This condition is anticipated to double by 2030 and quite triple by 2050 to 115 million.

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\r\n In this track we can discuss on Neurological changes in brain, Amyloid protein, Genetic associations and susceptibility genes, Role of Apo lipoprotein E, Brain trauma, Metabolic syndrome and Alzheimer’s disease, Protein misfolding, aggregation and toxicity, Disease-causing mutations, Epidemiology and prevalence, Histone modification, DNA methylation, Alzheimer’s disease prevention.

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  • Track 4-1Medical and Lifestyle Exposures
  • Track 4-2Obesity and Lack of Physical Activity
  • Track 4-3Disease-causing mutations

\r\n Alzheimer's is caused by brain cell death. It is a neurological disorder in which the death of brain cells causes memory loss and cognitive decline. The total size of the brain shrinks in Alzheimer's, nerve cells and connections in the tissue progressively reduced, which cannot be seen or tested in the living brain affected by Alzheimer's disease, post-mortem/autopsy will always show tiny inclusions in the nerve tissues, called as plaques and tangles. Plaques are found between the dying cells in the brain - from the build-up of a protein called beta-amyloid (amyloid plaques). The tangles exist in the brain neurons, from a disintegration of second protein, called tau.

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\r\n Worldwide, with Dementia or Related disorders nearly 44 million people have suffered in 2015,past results shown 35.66 million population  lived with dementia  worldwide in year 2010, with numbers expected to nearly double each twenty years, to 65.7 million in 2030 and 115.4 million in 2050. In 2010, fifty-eight per cent of all population with dementia lived in countries with lower or moderate incomes, with this proportion anticipated to rise to 63% till 2030 and 71% by 2050. This condition is anticipated to double by 2030 and quite triple by 2050 to 115 million.

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\r\n In this track we can discuss on Neurological changes in brain, Amyloid protein, Genetic associations and susceptibility genes, Role of Apo lipoprotein E, Brain trauma, Metabolic syndrome and Alzheimer’s disease, Protein misfolding, aggregation and toxicity, Disease-causing mutations, Epidemiology and prevalence, Histone modification, DNA methylation, Alzheimer’s disease prevention.

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  • Track 5-1 Risk Factors of Alzheimer’s
  • Track 5-2Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarker
  • Track 5-3 Epidemiology
  • Track 5-4Neurological damage

\r\n Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive dementia with loss of neurons and the presence of two main microscopic neuropathological hallmarks: extracellular amyloid plaques and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles. Early onset AD, a rare familial form, is caused due to mutation of one out of three genes: (amyloid precursor protein), (presenilin 2) or (presenilin 1).  Sporadic form occurs usually after age of 65 and accounts for most cases; it most likely results from a combination of genetic and influence of environment. Confirmed risk factors for sporadic AD are age and the presence of the E4 allele of (Apo lipoprotein E). Amyloid plaques comprise mainly of the neurotoxic peptide amyloid (Aβ, Abeta), cleaved sequentially from a larger precursor protein (APP) by two enzymes: β-secretase (also called BACE1) and γ-secretase (comprising four proteins, presenilin is one of them). If APP is first cleaved by the enzyme α-secretase rather than β-secretase then Aβ is not formed. Neurofibrillary tangles comprise mainly of the protein tau which binds with microtubules, which facilitating the neuronal transport system. Tau uncoupling from microtubules and aggregation into tangles inhibits transport and results in disassembly of microtubule. Phosphorylation of tau might have an important role in this. Selective vulnerability of neuronal systems such as the cholinergic, serotonergic, and noradrenergic and glutamatergic systems form the basis of current rational pharmacological treatment.

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  • Track 6-1Stem cells and Cell death
  • Track 6-2Cellular signaling, kinases, phosphatases, calcium
  • Track 6-3Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy
  • Track 6-4Tau Pathology of Alzheimers Disease
  • Track 6-5Pathogenesis of Alzheimers Disease

\r\n Neurodegenerative diseases consist of wide range of disorders, characterized by the progressive degeneration or death of nerve cells. It affects nerve tissue and causes different neuropsychological manifestations as well. It is an umbrella term for a range of conditions which particularly affect the neurons in the human brain.

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\r\n Genetic and environmental factors have been shown to play a vital role in the development of neurodegenerative diseases. Age is one of the major risk factors that is common between all types of neurodegenerative disease as it progresses at older ages commonly.

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  • \r\n Cognition
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  • \r\n Multiple Sclerosis
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  • \r\n Parkinson's disease
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  • \r\n Huntington's disease
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\r\n Neurovascular Dysfunction and Neurodegeneration

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  • Track 7-1Cognitive behavioral therapy
  • Track 7-2Cognition and Decision-Making
  • Track 7-3Brain Stimulation

\r\n Vascular dementia, otherwise called multi-infarct dementia is the second most basic reason for dementia in more seasoned individuals. Since it has a lower profile than Alzheimer's, many individuals don't speculate vascular dementia when neglect ends up noticeably hazardous. It's additionally hard to analyze so it's hard to know precisely what number of individuals experience the ill effects of vascular dementia. Current evaluations credit 15% to 20% of dementia cases in more established grown-ups to vascular dementia. Vascular dementia happens when vessels that supply blood to the cerebrum wind up noticeably blocked or limited. Strokes happen when the supply of blood conveying oxygen to the mind is suddenly cut off. Be that as it may, not all individuals with stroke will create vascular dementia. Vascular dementia can happen after some time as "noiseless" strokes heap up. Frequently, vascular dementia attracts regard for itself just when the effect of such many strokes means noteworthy handicap. Staying away from and controlling danger factors, for example, diabetes, hypertension, smoking, and elevated cholesterol can help check the danger of vascular dementia.

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  • Track 8-1Progression and later stages
  • Track 8-2Post-stroke dementia
  • Track 8-3Hallucinations or Delusions

\r\n Clinical trials are inquired about examinations led in individuals to decide if medicines are protected and viable. Without clinical research and the assistance of human volunteers, there can be no better medications, no counteractive action and no cure for Alzheimer's ailment.

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\r\n Clinical trials are occasionally alluded to as clinical examinations; the terms are frequently utilized reciprocally, yet there are unobtrusive contrasts between them. Clinical trials test new intercessions or medications to avoid, recognize or treat infection. A clinical report is any sort of clinical research including individuals, paying little heed to whether it is trying an intercession. Clinical examinations can likewise take a gander at different parts of care, for example, enhancing personal satisfaction.

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  • Track 9-1Preclinical Investigation to Clinical Trials
  • Track 9-2Clinical Studies of Alzheimers
  • Track 9-3Clinical trial design and methods
  • Track 9-4Quality of Life Trials

\r\n Alzheimer's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disease that is characterized histopathologically by the presence of plaques, mainly composed of Abeta amyloid and the tangles, mainly composed of hyper phosphorylated tau. To date, there is no treatment that can reverse the disease, and all the current therapeutics is directed to cope with the symptoms of the disease. Here we describe the efforts dedicated to attack the plaques and, in more detail, the process of neurofibrillary degeneration, linked to the presence of the hyper phosphorylated microtubule associated protein tau. We have identified the different putative targets for therapeutics and the current knowledge on them.

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\r\n Treatment for Alzheimer's disease is entering a new and exciting phase, with several new drugs beginning clinical trials. Many of these new therapies are based on our best current understanding of the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease, and are designed to try to either slow or halt the progression of the disease. There are several different theories underlying the current efforts, and these are briefly reviewed. Therapies directed against some aspect of beta-amyloid formation, against neurofibrillary tangle formation and against the inflammatory response are all considered, as are the problems associated with each area. It is yet unclear which, if any of these approaches will be successful, but the high level of activity in each of these three fields provides some hope that an effective treatment for Alzheimer's disease is on the horizon.

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  • Track 10-1Epidemiology of Neurodegenerative disease
  • Track 10-2Down Syndrome
  • Track 10-3Stroke treatments

\r\n Animal models for Alzheimer’s disease it is important to think about the human phenotype and what is being modeled in terms of the animal phenotype. The moderator, Bradley Hyman, professor of neurology at Harvard Medical School, said that animal models of Alzheimer’s disease, based on the genetics of the disease and the closely related frontotemporal dementia, replicate at least some of the pathology. Researchers have been successful at modeling very specific aspects of Alzheimer’s disease in the mouse (e.g., plaques, tangles). Although these are incomplete models of the human disease, they have been well received in the field as potentially relevant models for use in drug discovery.

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\r\n Patients with Alzheimer’s disease will display both amyloidopathy and tauopathy; however, scientists often focus, in a reductionist way, on one or the other in an animal model. A participant added that even though the anatomy in the mouse is different than the human, mutant tau mice are relatively good models in that they recapitulate tau-dependent neurodegeneration. This has led many companies to focus on antibodies that block tau-dependent neurodegeneration in these mouse models.

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\r\n This session includes Transgenic models, Pharmacological and lesion models, Natural and semi natural models, Primate models, Zebra fish models, Animal models of human cognitive aging, Development of new animal models, Genetics of translational models, Protein-protein interactions, Ethical issues with animal models.

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  • Track 11-1AD transgenic model
  • Track 11-2Preclinical diagnosis of AD
  • Track 11-3Mild cognitive impairment

Dementia is a progressive, irreversible decline in cognition that, by definition, impacts on a patient pre-existing level of functioning. The clinical syndrome of dementia has several etiologies of which Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common.

Drug development in AD is based on evolving pathophysiological theory. Disease modifying approaches include the targeting of amyloid processing, aggregation of tau, insulin signaling, neuro-inflammation and neurotransmitter dysfunction, with efforts thus far yielding abandoned hopes and ongoing promise. Reflecting its dominance on the pathophysiological stage the amyloid cascade is central to many of the emerging drug therapies.

Breakthrough in Dementia

  • Track 12-1Alzheimers studies
  • Track 12-2Dementia studies
  • Track 12-3Breakthrough in Dementia
  • Track 12-4Case Reports